week 26: Lisa Call

The Art

Structures #129  ©Lisa Call
12″ x 12″ fabric, thread, dye
o
n stretched canvas  $520

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Lisa-Call_structures-129_12-x-12ins_on-stretched-canvas_2

The Music

“Little Fugue” (2:57 mins) © Helen Davey.
(prepared piano for 8 hands)
for Lydia

 

Artist’s Notes

Lisa Call

The Structures series, which investigates the boundaries we use to  divide our world, originated in 2001 as an exploration of human-made structures for containment such as fences and stone walls. Lines of posts, negative space created between odd shaped stones, and uniform rows of bricks were all of interest.

As the series matured, focus has shifted to the psychological barriers humans use to protect themselves emotionally, exploring how we hide our true thoughts and feelings with these imaged roadblocks. Some question that inform the work:

• Do we put up walls to keep others out or to keep ourselves in?

Do these imagined boundaries really keep us safe?

• Are we hiding from ourselves or from the outside?

• What are the risks and benefits of exposure should the walls come down?

The textile paintings continue to reference the physical fences and walls that initially caught my attention, but as the series progresses these constructs often become more abstract.

 

My Music

I wanted to work with Lisa’s exploration of containment so I chose a Fugue as a high structured musical form to “colour in”.  You’ll hear 4 voices entering with the main theme during the exposition representing the 4 quadrants of Lisa’s artwork.  These voices repeat their angular melody line in another key for a compact development (episode) before the return to the tonic and the final “hitting the wall” ending.

Each of the voices’ respective areas of development are like little patchwork pictures in their own right that can meld to form the larger piece. They each have their own patterns, timbre combinations and rhythmic individuality to give a rich texture. This is where I was ruminating on the themes around containment.

I’ve selected the following sound sources as musical devices to evoke some of the qualities of this beautiful piece of art.

 – Lydian modality:  the brightest of the modes in response to the rich colours. Thanks to Manuela Keller* for her insights into my fun with modes;

 – Tempo: 129 bpm (to carry Lisa’s “Structures #129”);

 – Prepared piano (means popping things inside a piano to create a wide array of  tone colours that can enrich textural elements and add contrasts). This was my aim for this sound-painting as I wanted to evoke a softness and more spheric dimension to the music to reflect the textural quality of the art.

textile-paintings meet sound-paintings inside the grand piano

textile-paintings meet sound-paintings inside the grand piano


Here’s a few of the toys I used for Petit Fugue:

1. lace spindles inserted between strings, tapped with wooden mallets for a sense of spaciousness,

2. strings “dampened” with fingertips to give a duller quality

3. strings struck with wooden mallets of the bowed or plucked strings.

I love that Lisa calls her works textile paintings. It seemed apt that I sound-paint to one of her works. Thanks so much for listening and reading thus far.
Today marks the half way point of project 52 Sound-Paintings! Isn’t that remarkable – 26 weeks of art and music to date.    HOORAY !!!!!   


To celebrate this milestone, next week, I will release CD volume 2 of Project “52 Sound-Paintings” so you can tell everyone you know they’ve still got time to grab a copy before Christmas… or all the birthdays between.
Fugalee pips
Helen

Manuela Keller: “Dur, Moll und ihre vier Schwestern. Kurze Klavierstücke in kirchentonarten zum spielen und improvisieren – auch vierhändig” (2006, Musik Verlag Nepomuk, Schweiz).

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10 comments to week 26: Lisa Call

  • Lovely, Helen – what a nice Friday afternoon treat.

  • Kate

    this is beautiful – thanks Helen & Lisa.

  • I like this one a lot–it builds up and up and feels quietly exciting before it recedes–like climbing a hill, cresting it, then vanishing over the edge and down. Beautiful textile piece: reminds me of aerial views of farmland.

  • Love the associations you have with this one Bronle – both the music and the textile painting – I really enjoy hearing/reading where my music transports people to…. and I couldn’t agree more re Lisa’s art and farmlands. I thoroughly enjoyed etching those darker, dividing lines (with a violin bow) to hear the effects on the spaces in between.

  • Silvia

    Congrats for the half way point of project 52 ! I am longing every week to get the new composition. Thanks so much for all these treats.
    Oh, WOW, I do like this week’s painting and your excellent music for it! Both Lisa‘s and your explanations are very interesting and help to enjoy painting and music with much more awareness. I especially like the end of your melody: for me it is an open end and evokes the thought „And what, if I dare leaving away the boundaries?“.

    Mille hoorays :-)!

  • Hi Silvia, Thanks for your warm congratulations. It’s so great that you look forward to the weekly art and music of project 52.

    I love your interpretation of the ending to my little fugue and it’s gratifying to know that our artists’notes add to your engagement with our respective artworks.

  • Helen – I’m honored to have been included in this project. Thank you!!

    Love love the sound painting you’ve made in response to my textile painting!

    —lisa

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